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speak loudly. September 21, 2010

Posted by Katie in community.
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These days, I’m a quiet presence in the book blogging community. I still interact with y’all on Twitter. I still read all of your entries, but I’ve taken a step back from updating here as often as I used to.

When news surfaced late last week that Laurie Halse Anderson’s book “Speak” was under fire again in a town in Missouri (along with Sarah Ockler’s “Twenty Boy Summer” and Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five”), I struggled to give words to my reaction. After days of reflection, I am sad and I am angry still.

“Speak” had a profound meaning in my life. It was published when I was in ninth grade and was one of the first books that I recall ever really being written for contemporary teens. It was a book that, I believe, led me to becoming a librarian by showing me that teen literature existed.

“Speak” has also had a profound meaning in the lives of the teens that I work with. We have three copies (a lot for my small-medium sized public library — we only have three copies of “Twilight” too), and they are constantly being checked out. And of course, many teens have shared with me their personal “Speak” stories. Stories that are always about finding strength through this work of literature.

It’s hard for me to sit here and know that this book banning is going on around me, and for me to have nothing to do, for lack of a better term. I struggle with not being able to squelch this challenge, with not being able to stamp out the fire that it is causing. I struggle to know how to help a community that I am not a part of.

Instead, I focus on the little bits that I can control. Tonight was Teen Book Club and I set aside five minutes to remind my teens how lucky they are that they have the freedom to read. I told them about this challenge, and reminded them that no one [other than their parents/guardians, of course] had any business telling them what was appropriate for them to read. And I emphasized that I will always be here to help them if a challenge happens to them.

Twenty teens are now reminded that I am their ally. And maybe I will be able to sleep just a little bit better tonight.

nerds heart ya: results! June 23, 2010

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So very excited to have this bracket’s result for Nerds Heart YA today. Heather from Book Addiction and I judged these together, emailing back and forth until we both wound up on the same side. (It wasn’t too hard though — we came to a decision pretty quickly!) You can go read Heather’s post and reviews right here.

In the Path of Falling Objects by Andrew Smith.

Two brothers – Jonah and Simon – are on the road trip from hell. Their brother Matthew’s in Vietnam in the army, their mother’s deserted them, and they’ve just hitched a ride with Mitch, Lilly, and a metal statue of Don Quixote. Lilly’s pregnant, and Mitch just isn’t right – he’s quick to anger, and Jonah is worried for all of their safety. But Simon doesn’t see Mitch as a threat. As tensions rise and the brothers continue to butt heads, Jonah is determined to get both Simon and Lilly away from Mitch.

I’m kind of on the fence about this book. Overall, I enjoyed the read and think that it is a deserving title and one I will be adding to my library’s collection for my teen boys to read.

My biggest problem was the pacing of the novel. It was billed as a suspense novel from the descriptions, and I was not in suspense for a majority of the novel. The first half of the novel is a slow build, and I really struggled to continue the book. I kept waiting for Mitch to snap and for the action to start – but with that complaint, let me say, when the action starts, it doesn’t stop. I devoured the last 100 pages or so of the book, and was actually late getting back to work because I needed to finish the book.

Mitch is a fully realized sociopath. Every scene with him had my stomach pitching to see what would happen to the characters around him.

Jonah’s relationships with both of his brothers are what really sold the book for me. As much as this book was about suspense and Mitch, it was really about being brothers. Matthew’s letters home were my absolute favorite part of the novel and I looked forward to them, even as everyone’s situations were getting worse.

Smith’s writing is refreshing, and incredibly layered. This is a gritty read that I know will be a good book to sell to older teens looking for suspense/action.

Four stars.

Purple Heart by Patricia McCormick.

After being injured in the war, Matt wakes up in an army hospital in Iraq. He’s been awarded the Purple Heart, but Matt’s amnesia prevents him from remembering why he’s being honored as a hero. As Matt struggles to put together the missing pieces from his last time in combat, he’s haunted by an image of a local Iraqi boy, Ali, being shot in front of him. And Matt has a hunch that he was involved in Ali’s death.

I had a personal reaction to this book – my cousin has served in both Iraq and Afghanistan in the air force. Although my cousin is older than 18-year-old Matt, I couldn’t help but picture my cousin in Matt’s situation.

That being said, I thought that the book was a realistic portrayal of a teen struggling with a mystery. I really felt for Matt when he was trying to figure out what happened to him. I have no idea whether or not the book had an accurate representation of military life in a war zone, but I was definitely impressed by the amount of research that McCormick mentions in the acknowledgments portion at the back of the novel.

While Matt was a strong protagonist, he didn’t have all his memories. I felt a little bit of a disconnect from his character at times because of that. However, the rest of the people in Matt’s squad have such personality and I really loved getting to know those characters, along with Matt.

I don’t want to say much about what really happened during Matt’s injury and Ali’s death, but let me just say that I was surprised when it was finally revealed. I did not see it coming, and let out a small gasp at the end.

McCormick is such a solid writer – I’ve already read “Cut” by her for my Teen Book Club – and this novel shows off both her writing, and her research skills. I eagerly look forward to discussing this one with my teens.

Four and a half stars.

Discussion

So, let’s talk about the decision process. The books were nearly a dead-heat tie. I had minor problems with each of the books, but nothing that would knock either of them out of the competition.

In my opinion, Purple Heart was more relatable and was a book that I could see a majority of teens reading and enjoying. In the Path of Falling Objects also had definite merit to it, but the chilling end scenes would have me recommending the book for teens 16+. But, I think that In the Path of Falling Objects may have a longer shelf-life in YA because of the suspense element. Purple Heart may not last on shelves after the war has past.

For me, personally, it came down to which book I would want to re-read and re-discover. And that book was Purple Heart.

48 hour book challenge! June 4, 2010

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It’s about that time again. I am so excited to be participating again in MotherReader’s 48-Hour Book Challenge! This was my kick-off event in the book blogging community, and it is still one of my favorite events.

Last time, I didn’t post a starting line post — this time I am playing by the rules!

I have a general plan for reading:

- Read my two judging books for Nerds Heart YA.
– Tackle some ARCs from BEA. (Yes, I will also have a BEA post up when I find my camera cord…)
– Read a galley I got from a publisher from *before* BEA.

Other than that, I have no hard plans. I’m such a mood reader that I can’t plan out my reading ahead of time! That being said, I probably will read a lot of ARC sequels that I got so that I can pass them on to my teens in a timely manner. (And, you know, before the book is out.)

And my writing goal is to write reviews for every book I complete during the challenge so that I don’t get increasing behind in reviewing!

(I’ll be using Bloggiesta next weekend to catch up on all my reviews from before 48-Hour Book Challenge.)

I plan on reading from 9:00 p.m. CDT tonight (Friday) to 9:00 p.m. CDT Sunday.

Wish me luck, all! And let me know if you’re participating so I can cheer you on as well!

debut book battle. May 11, 2010

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Alyssa from The Shady Glade is hosting an amazing book battle for debut authors. You can find out more about the debut book battle through this link, if you want to! I was lucky enough to be a judge for Round I and I was assigned the following books:

Because I Am Furniture by Thalia Chaltas VS. Eighth-Grade Superzero by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich.

I was really excited to read both of these books (and very pleasantly surprised that I hadn’t read either of the books already), so I got them from my library immediately.

First impressions: “Because I Am Furniture” really struck me as a cover image. I loved the use of negative space on the cover and really felt like it was an image that gave me an idea of the book’s themes. “Eight-Grade Superzero” looked immediately like a middle-grade novel to me, rather than YA. (Actually after reading it, from a librarian perspective, the book could be shelved in either section. I chose to shelve it as YA in my library.)

I read “Because I Am Furniture” first, because it had a sooner due date at the library. Anke is a fourteen year old girl whose family is being abused by her father — everyone but her. “Because I Am Furniture” struck me as powerful, both in terms of subject matter and in terms of writing. The story is told as a novel in verse. This style absolutely suited the book, letting me know exactly how Anke was feeling and allowing me little glimpses into her situation.

After I finished, I wasn’t sure how to judge this novel against another, because of the subject matter.

But I launched into “Eighth-Grade Superzero” right after that. Reggie is an eighth-grader striving to be invisible at school after puking at an assembly on the first day — that is until he gets involved volunteering and discovers a reason to be visible again. “Eighth-Grade Superzero” was a hilarious, touching book and I not only fell in love with Reggie, but with the writing of the novel.

I promise to talk more about each book when I review it later on the blog, but when it came time to decide between the two, I was struck at just how similar the books were to one another. Without spoiling either ending, I can safely say that these two books were about teens struggling to find their voices — to speak up for people around them who cannot or do speak up for themselves, for whatever reason.

So, it was with a heavy heart that I chose between them and I chose to pass on “Eighth-Grade Superzero” to the next round. I do believe that both books are fabulous additions to YA literature, and I know that both will find their teen audiences. I just wound up enjoying “Eighth-Grade Superzero” more on a personal and a literary level.

And now I can’t wait to see how the rest of the YA Debut Book Battle turns out. Stay tuned at The Shady Glade for the results of each round!

poc reading challenge. February 1, 2010

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One of the best things, in my opinion, that you can do in response to the whitewashing problems we’ve seen in YA fiction is by joining this challenge. I am very excited about this challenge and I encourage you to join it. There’s several levels of participation to join at — I’m choosing Level 5, which will challenge me to read 16-25 books that feature people of color or books that are written by people of color.

I won’t be listing my books ahead of time because I’m a grazer — I like to pick and choose my books as I go along.

This isn’t really a challenge in the traditional sense for me — this is a commitment. I am promising myself (and the blogging community) that I have realized the problem and that I’m committed to working towards changing it.

unsung ya aka the best ya books you haven’t read. January 21, 2010

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So, maybe you’ve heard of this super awesome secret project run by Kelly of YAnnabe. Maybe you haven’t. She pulled me in by asking if I blogged, if I had LibraryThing, and if I had rated books there. Then, she sent me this in an email.

I would love for you to join me in a one-day blog post blitz titled “The Best YA Books You Haven’t Read.” You would pick 5 or 10 YA books you LOVE (or however many you want) to highlight in your post. The goal is to highlight YA books that haven’t gotten the attention they deserve. These books may not have made a splash when they were first released, so we’re going to make a splash for them.

I immediately said yes.

Kelly came up with a way to see which YA books we loved (using our LibraryThing ratings) that were unsung (using LibraryThing to determine how many people owned/rated/reviewed the books).

I’ve chosen to highlight five books today from my LibraryThing account!

Old Magic

By: Marianne Curley

Originally published: 2002. (You know, when I was in high school.) Republished: December 22, 2009.

The facts: Kate is a psychic. Jarrod is the new kid. Freaky things start to happen. Kate knows they’re related to Jarrod. Magic. Romance. Australian author.

I wanted this book desperately when it first came out. Saw it in Waldenbooks, but was saving money for college. So I didn’t buy it. Fast-forward to 2007 when I started my YA librarian position and weeded YA fiction. Found this book and the rest is history.

I’ve worn out a purchased copy already, folks. Just bought the re-cover and the Nook edition.

This book reminds me of exactly what I loved about YA fiction as a teen. I fell into the story so easily and just went with it. Paranormal romance from before “Twilight” was even a thought in someone’s mind. It’s definitely more of a light read, but I absolutely adore it. And might go re-read it once I post this.

Sucks to Be Me: The All-True Confessions of Mina Hamilton, Teen Vampire…Maybe

By: Kimberly Pauley

Originally published: 2008.

The facts: Mina’s got a problem. See, her parents are vampires and she’s not supposed to know about them. Now she’s got a choice: become a vampire and stay with her parents or have her memory erased.

Guys, this was my first ever ARC. That’s got nothing to do with how much I adored this book, but I wanted to mention it. Full disclosure and all.

What I loved about this book was that it was such a refreshing break from traditional vampire books. There’s no mystery, no horror, and no deeply troubling vampire-human romance. Mina’s a smart, witty, funny character and I loved watching her as she made her decision.

Additionally, there is a sequel coming and I cannot wait until it’s out. The ending is wrapped up, but open, and I’ve missed Mina since I finished this book.

How to Be Bad

By: E. Lockhart, Sarah Mlynowski, and Lauren Myracle

Originally published: 2008.

The facts: Three girls. One road trip. Unforgettable memories.

I’m truly surprised that this book hasn’t gotten a lot of press. Not only are all of the authors of this book well received in the YA world, but it’s just a wonderful teen book. A great road trip story full of twists and turns, the characters are dynamic, and it’s one of my favorite collaborative works.

I’ve already written a classic review of this title on the blog which you can read here: “Classic Review: How to Be Bad.”

Prom Dates from Hell

By: Rosemary Clement-Moore

Originally published: 2007.

The facts: Maggie Quinn’s a teen reporter for her high school. So when something dark and nasty starts happening to kids at her school — you can bet she’s on the case. Even if it means going to prom…

I read this one in my YA literature class during supernatural/horror week. I had to run out and purchase it because it was a debut and only in two libraries in the system. So glad I did because it was my favorite book of the class.

Part mystery, part supernatural/horror, part romance, all humorous — this is a read sure to keep you up until you finish it (like it did for me!). The best part about it is that it’s totally a series, too. “Hell Week” and “Highway to Hell” round it out and I can only hope there’s more on the way.

The Black Sheep

By: Yvonne Collins and Sandy Rideout

Originally published: 2007.

The facts: Kendra’s sick of her parents. So, she signs up for a reality television show to switch places with another teen who’s also sick of her parents. Imagine her surprise when she’s actually chosen…

A light, fluffy read that I read while driving up the California coast (from L.A. to San Francisco) on a road trip. I might have really enjoyed the book because I was in California (where the book takes place), but I think I just enjoyed a great ride.

Kendra really grows up in the book and it’s a great book for tweens crossing into YA for the first time. It’s a quick read, but worth it.

And that’s the end of my unsung YA list for this time around. I’ll definitely be participating with this if Kelly ever wants to give it another whirl!

discussion: “magic under glass” January 19, 2010

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“Magic Under Glass” is a fabulous debut by author Jaclyn Dolamore, one that I recently had the privilege of reading. I purchased the book a) because it’s fantasy and I love fantasy; b) because it’s a debut author; c) because it was compared to Libba Bray’s Gemma Doyle trilogy — some of my favorite YA books.

“Magic Under Glass” tells the story of Nimira, a troup dancer/singer who catches the eye of a wealthy man named Hollin Parry. Parry offers her the chance to sing in his home, with an automaton who plays the piano — an automaton that is haunted. Nimira accepts and soon finds that there is more to the automaton, to Parry, and to her new world than meets the eye.

Nimira is from the East. There are countless references to her skin color as she is dressed and undressed by servants of Parry. And I quote:

“She brought forth the splendid gown, with its rustling silk and air of grandeur. It dipped low in back and front, with cream and black velvet flowers crawling around the neckline, exposing what seemed like far too much of my brown skin. I tried not to care how pale Linza’s hands were against mine.” – Page 105.

As you can see from the cover image above — that is clearly a white model. She absolutely does not have brown skin.

Originally I hadn’t planned on blogging about this until Dolamore had a chance to personally respond. I prefer to get as much of the story as I can before leaping into the fray. Dolamore is preparing a post, as she stated right here, but I don’t want to wait any longer.

Timeline of Events:

(Please feel free to leave links in the comments. I haven’t gotten through my feed reader, so I know I’m already missing posts. I will work on adding those in tomorrow. All times reflect post times/dates as I see them on my screen.)

  • Jaclyn Dolamore through Flickr posts her drawing of Nimira [December 31st, 2009].
  • Aja at Bookshop calls attention to the fact that Bloomsbury has chosen again to use a white cover model instead of an accurate representation of the character’s race. As far as I can see, this is the farthest back post. Also, contains profanity, for those who are sensitive to that [Friday evening, 10:14 p.m.].
  • Ah Yuan at GAL Novelty writes about the cover controversy. Also provides helpful links to previous discussions about “Liar” [Saturday afternoon, 12:44 p.m.].
  • Ari at Reading In Color responds to finding out about the cover. Excellent links to other blogger posts [Saturday night, 8:37 p.m.].
  • Susan at Black-Eyed Susan’s discusses Bloomsbury’s whitewashing again [Sunday morning, 10:57 a.m.].
  • Ari at Reading In Color write an open letter to Bloomsbury about the issue [Sunday evening, 8:35 p.m.]
  • Kristi at The Story Siren asks if she’s a bad person because she didn’t notice the discrepancy between Nimira’s character and the cover model [Sunday evening, 9:04 p.m.].
  • Amy at My Friend Amy talks about why we are offended and how we should unite as a community [Monday morning, 10:32 a.m.].
  • Susan at Black-Eyed Susan’s explains further why she has chosen to boycott Bloomsbury [Monday morning, 10:50 a.m.].
  • Anna North writes at Jezebel about the cover controversy [Monday afternoon, 4:00 p.m.]
  • Ana at Book Smugglers ponders covers and their misrepresentations in YA literature [Monday afternoon, around 4:00 p.m.].
  • Colleen at Chasing Ray posts a summary of the events thus far [Monday evening, approximately 10:00 p.m.].

Here is what I know:

1. This cover is wrong. Bloomsbury was wrong to okay it. It’s wrong when people cannot see themselves on the covers of books because of color, because of size. Because someone decides what I’m going to buy or not buy ahead of time, without any clue with how I choose my books.

2. We — the blogging community — need to speak out about this and to speak out about this as often as we can. Because nothing’s going to be done if we don’t say anything.

2a. I have not always done so. I briefly mentioned the “Liar” cover controversy on the blog. Briefly isn’t going to cut it.
2b. I believe this offers us a chance to unite as a true community.

3. Authors have absolutely nothing to do with covers, for the most part. And I can’t imagine that a debut author has the power to debate the cover model with any kind of authority.

4. Boycotting “Magic Under Glass” or Jaclyn Dolamore is not my choice of action. I loved “Magic Under Glass” and am pleased to say I own it. It’s a wonderful book.

Here’s what I’m doing:

1. Not purchasing Bloomsbury books, but rather waiting patiently to check them out of the library.

2. I am making a change in my reading this year and trying to read more deliberately. I will be seeking out books that feature people of color prominently on the cover.

3. Additionally, I will be purchasing those books instead of checking them out of the library.

4. Speaking out about the issue, continuing to educate myself, and working to educate other bloggers and my teens at the library.

5. Contacting Bloomsbury to make them hear me as a reader, a blogger, and a librarian.

It’s 4:30 a.m. Chicago time. I have literally been reading about this for nearly eight hours straight at this point. I am not done updating the timeline or listening to the bloggers speaking out about this issue. Already, I have added nearly half a dozen bloggers to my feed reader, half a dozen new voices to be heard. Please keep talking about this very important issue.

I invite everyone to participate in the comments. Please be respectful and keep it clean, or I’ll remove the comment.

bloggiesta: wrap-up post! January 11, 2010

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Well, another fabulous Bloggiesta hosted by Natasha of Maw Books Blog has come to the close!

The verdict? I spent thirty-nine hours on the challenge.

Managed to make three update posts: Bloggiesta Day One!, Bloggiesta Day Two!, and Bloggiesta Day Three!. And made a separate post to keep track of all of the mini-challenges: Bloggiesta Mini-Challenges.

And one last time — the to-do list of accomplished items:

  • Make a Blogaversary button and link it up in the sidebar.
  • Update my challenges section. I have four challenges I haven’t updated over there and a couple of posts to link up.
  • Awards — several of you fabulous people have passed on blogger awards to me and I absolutely fail at putting them up/acknowledging that I’ve received them. I’ll fix that.
  • Information about “Where I Read.” Now can be found under the “blog” tab. :D
  • Need to update my sidebar buttons.
  • Creating book review templates for all of the books that I’ve read, but don’t have templates for.
  • Doing my monthly round-ups for September, October, November, and December. I’ve been lax about these!
  • Going back through my ARC reviews and linking up my library catalog if they received the book by now.
  • Making a Twitter button.
  • Moving my blogroll to its own page; making sure links are still correct and working; double-checking Bloglines vs. blogroll to add/delete bloggers.– Side thought — do readers use blogrolls anymore?
  • Update my lists on Twitter/clean out followers for spambots. [Used great tool TwitBlock available here.]
  • Get a better subscribe link right up front in the blog.
  • Make a “my posts elsewhere” area to link where I’ve guest blogger, interviewed, and what weeks I’ve participated in.
  • Double check my publication dates area for accuracy. Add any other reads I’ve wishlist-ed on Goodreads.
  • Make a “contact me” page with email, links to social networking tools, etc. Under “contact” tab.
  • Clean up tags.
  • Update my Debut Author Challenge reading list.
  • Mini-Challenges from 2009> Yep, all twelve of them. It was a TON of fun, but a lot of work. I’m so glad I did it.
  • Mini-Challenges from 2010.
  • Business cards. I looked into this, but as I’m thinking about going to self-hosting, I’m holding off on ordering business cards until I make a decision about self hosting.
  • Join more challenges and link them up as well. (This was so not planned…)
  • Clean up categories vs. tags.

And the didn’t accomplished list:

  • Cross-posting reviews to Goodreads, LibraryThing, and Amazon.com.
  • Schedule posts for as often as I can.
  • Run my 2009 statistics & make post. Make reading goals.

All of these are MINOR things — I accomplished everything major I wanted to do. I am so pleased with this go-round at Bloggiesta. Mark your calendars for June 2010 for the next one! I’ll be there. ;D

more 2010 challenges. January 10, 2010

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Well, one of the best things about Bloggiesta was that I found a TON of 2010 challenges that I want to take part in. Here’s my post stating my intentions to join them! And because I’m joining so many, here’s some anchor links to help you figure out which ones are in the posts:

Audio Book Challenge || 10 in 10 Teen Chick Lit Challenge ||
The Chain Reading Challenge || E-Book Reading Challenge ||
In the Middle Reading Challenge || YA Reading Challenge



Royal Reviews is hosting an audio book challenge. Because I’ve only listened to two audio books in my whole life, I’m going for the smallest level — Curious — and will be listening to three audio books this year!



Kay Cassidy and Jessica of Chick Lit Teens are co-hosting a reading challenge. The goal is simple — read 10 teen chick lit titles this year. I don’t have my list yet, but I’m so excited to join this challenge. I love chick lit!



Karin from The Book Jacket is asking us to find connections between books; to create a chain. So, if I read “Shiver” by Maggie Stiefvater and use the main character’s name (Grace) as my link, I can start reading “The Dark Divine” who also has a Grace for a main character. Or I could have read another book set in Minnesota. Or about werewolves. You get the idea. I’m going to try my hardest to complete a chain of eight books. I’m not going to list them now though so that I can be free to think of them naturally as I read.



Royal Reviews is hosting an e-book reading challenge. Since I just purchased a Nook, I figured this would be the perfect challenge for me to do this year. I’m going for the highest level — Obsessed — where my goal will be to read 20 e-books this year.



Jill from The O.W.L. wants us all to read some middle grade fiction this year! Now, this is an area I should pay more attention to because while I love YA and am a YA librarian, I also need to connect to the tweens in my library on their way to becoming teens! So, I’ve chosen to participate in the highest level — an 8th Grader — which means I need to read 10 middle grade books. Looking forward to it!



J. Kaye’s Book Blog is hosting the YA reading challenge. I know, I know — for me this challenge was a bit of a “duh” moment. As if…why haven’t I heard of THIS ONE before? And why hadn’t I joined? Well, I have now! I will be reading at the “Super Size Me” level, which challenges me to read 75 YA books.

bloggiesta: day three! January 10, 2010

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And we’re on day three of Bloggiesta! I could really use some cheerleading today, as I am exhausted. But I still have a lot to accomplish from my list. Here’s the current update:

  • Make a Blogaversary button and link it up in the sidebar.
  • Update my challenges section. I have four challenges I haven’t updated over there and a couple of posts to link up.
  • Awards — several of you fabulous people have passed on blogger awards to me and I absolutely fail at putting them up/acknowledging that I’ve received them. I’ll fix that.
  • Information about “Where I Read.”
  • Need to update my sidebar buttons.
  • Cross-posting reviews to Goodreads, LibraryThing, and Amazon.com.
  • Creating book review templates for all of the books that I’ve read, but don’t have templates for.
  • Doing my monthly round-ups for September, October, November, and December. I’ve been lax about these!
  • Going back through my ARC reviews and linking up my library catalog if they received the book by now.
  • Making a Twitter button.
  • Moving my blogroll to its own page; making sure links are still correct and working; double-checking Bloglines vs. blogroll to add/delete bloggers.
  • Schedule posts for as often as I can.
  • Update my lists on Twitter/clean out followers for spambots. [Used great tool TwitBlock available here.]
  • Run my 2009 statistics & make post. Make reading goals.
  • Get a better subscribe link right up front in the blog.
  • Make a “my posts elsewhere” area to link where I’ve guest blogger, interviewed, and what weeks I’ve participated in.
  • Double check my publication dates area for accuracy. Add any other reads I’ve wishlist-ed on Goodreads.
  • Make a “contact me” page with email, links to social networking tools, etc.
  • Clean up tags.
  • Update my Debut Author Challenge reading list.
  • Mini-Challenges from 2009> Yep, all twelve of them. It was a TON of fun, but a lot of work. I’m so glad I did it.
  • Mini-Challenges from 2010.
  • Business cards.
  • Join more challenges and link them up as well. (This was so not planned…)
  • Clean up categories vs. tags.

Once again, I’ll be updating this post, or you can follow my progress live on Twitter — @katietweetsya.

Hours Twenty-Three through Thirty-Nine

  • Information about “Where I Read.” Now can be found under the “blog” tab. :D
  • Creating book review templates for all of the books that I’ve read, but don’t have templates for.
  • Moving my blogroll to its own page; making sure links are still correct and working; double-checking Bloglines vs. blogroll to add/delete bloggers.– Side thought — do readers use blogrolls anymore?
  • Make a “my posts elsewhere” area to link where I’ve guest blogger, interviewed, and what weeks I’ve participated in. Under “contact” tab.
  • Make a “contact me” page with email, links to social networking tools, etc.
  • Double check my publication dates area for accuracy. Add any other reads I’ve wishlist-ed on Goodreads.
  • Update my Debut Author Challenge reading list.
  • Join more challenges and link them up as well. (This was so not planned…)
  • Business cards. I looked into this, but as I’m thinking about going to self-hosting, I’m holding off on ordering business cards until I make a decision about self hosting.

And whew, I’m done with this Bloggiesta. Wrap-Up post coming shortly!

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